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UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -STOUT - MEWOfiQilE, WISCONSIN 54751 



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Many a young lad has dreamed of running away 
to join the circus. Wayne Franzen has made that 
dream come true. The 27-year-old Stout alumnus 
quit his job last year to start the first circus to 
come out of Wisconsin since the mid 1950's. 

Armed with a lot of courage, family support and 
a life-long desire to work with a circus, Franzen has 
put together an eight act show that played 68 towns. 

Franzen was graduated from Stout in 1968 and 
spent six years teaching junior and senior high 
school, first at Edgerton and later at Stevens Point. 
But in the back of Franzen's mind, there remained 
that boyhood desire to be associated with the circus. 
At first Franzen thought he could work in a circus 
part-time during his summer recess from teaching, 
but that wasn't practical. He finally got the cour- 
age to make the move when he returned to Stout to 
do some graduate course work. Mike Ritlan.d, one 
of his teachers, discovered his secret ambition and 
encouraged him to make the move. 

"He (Ritland) wanted to know how you really 
felt; he wanted you to be honest to yourself," 
Franzen said. "We had to write what we wanted to 
do with our lives in a paragraph for him. I decided 
I'd be honest about it; i put down I'd like to have a 
circus. He said I should go do it." 

So with some "scrounged" capital and the sup- 
port of his wife, brother, sister-in-law, and mother, 
he set out to create what is now known as "Franzen 
Bros. Circus." Headquartered at Amherst Junction, 
a small community near Stevens Point, the show in- 
cludes an elephant, two horses, a mule, a llama, seven 
goats, three dogs and a lion. There are also human 
performers who do things such as acrobatics, aerial 
acts and juggling. 

"It's a small circus under a tent that gives it an 
atmosphere all its own," Franzen said. "This past 
year, we provided a continuous 80-minute perfor- 
mance." 

Franzen, who grew up in a small northern Wis- 
consin farm, has trained all his own animals, a feat 
that even some seasoned circus professionals would 
not attempt. "I guess you're just born with it," 
Franzen said, adding that his farm background was 
very helpful. "Farmers are close to animals," he 
said. "On our little farm, we watered each individual 
calf with a pail." He recalls that when he was in 
the sixth grade he trained a calf to bow, much to 
the chagrin of his father who discouraged his circus 
antics. Instead, his father wanted him to go to 



college and to become a teacher. "He thought the 
circus was a thing of the past," Franzen said. 

Putting a small circus on its feet is no small 
task and Franzen has had some anxious moments. 
Last year, there were problems with a booking 
agent and the circus spent nearly 30 days without 
work. Then there was the time the troupe showed 
up in one community and found not a single ticket 
had been sold. But Franzen also boasts that they 
have played to as many as 1,300 people under the 
60 x 120 foot tent which houses the circus. 

It costs about $550 a day to maintain the show, 
which is moved from town to town by five trucks, 
plus personal cars and a trailer. 

Franzen paid as much as $6,000 for the purchase 
and delivery of his elephant and as little as $250 
for the lion. . "Lions are cheap," he said, but added, 
"The lion eats about, four times its cost in meat 
every year." 

All performances by the circus are sponsored 
by local organizations. The sponsor gets 40 percent 
on the advance tickets sold, and if the advance sales 
total more than $800, they receive 10 percent of 
tickets sold at the door. 

Although circus life may be rewarding to Fran- 
zen, it isn't necessarily a lot of fun. For example, 
the traveling crew was supposed to consist of 22 
people, but members dropped out along the way and 
one time they were down to 11 persons. "When we 
had 11, that meant that every performer worked 
from six in the morning until 11 at night, putting 
up and taking down the tent," said Franzen, who 
estimates that during those times he was earning 
about a nickel an hour. "When we have the whole 
crew, we got up later, but still worked to 11 o'clock 
at night." 

The crew itself is an unlikely assemblage of 
people, hardly typifying circus performers. Part of 
last year's maiden tour was bolstered by members 
of Franzen's family. While he worked with animals, 
his wife ran the business end of the operation and 
his brother Neil served as a business partner, worked 
as a clown and sold concessions. Neil's wife, Sue, 
learned to be an aerialist and their two-year-old 
daughter, Heather, marched in the grand finale as 
a clown. Neil has sold his portion of the circus, and 
he and Sue won't be with the group next year. 
However, another brother, Gary, and a sister, Kathy, 
will join the troupe, along with Franzen's mother, 
who will cook and help out in the office. 

The rest of the act consists largely of college 
students. One such student is Elizabeth Bussey, who 
serves as the show announcer, runs the puppet act 
in a side show and plays the organ. Another student, 
Paul Niebauer, a UW-Madison theatre major, eats 



fire, performs as a clown and plays trumpet along 
with the organist. Jeff Chalmers dropped out of 
the seminary to become a high wire artist for the 
circus. Two Janesville college students do a tum- 
bling act. 

Franzen said he obtained some of his employees 
through advertisements he took out in college news- 
papers. "I was out looking for acts and some of the 
circuses had really rough looking acts," he said. "I 
wanted someone who didn't cost so much, so I got to 
thinking that a lot of kids in college have talents 
that fit right into the circus." 

Franzen said he considers his operation a "one 
ring" circus, although acts alternate between two 
rings in front of the bleachers. But he is quick to 
add that his "one ring" circus is larger than some 
operations which advertise themselves as "three 
ring" circuses. 

One of Franzen's favorite acts is the goat act, 
which took four years to prepare. "The last thing 
you'd ever want to train are goats," he said. "But 
I like them most of all. They are the hardest to 
train, and they never get the applause the elephant 
does." The seven goats roll barrels, make pyramids, 
crawl, walk on a balanced beam and play "leap 
goat." There is a liberty act in which a horse per- 
forms in a ring. But ever since the horse jumped 
out of the ring several times last summer, Franzen 
has learned to "hope for the best and expect the 
worst." In a "dog and mule act," two dogs perform 
tricks, jump through hoops and then ride a mule. 

There is a llama who jumps hurdles, bows, and 
lays down. "A llama is a dumb animal, but they are 
graceful and pretty," Franzen .said. 



Calling his organization "the best one ring circus 
in the country," Franzen thinks that circuses are 
making a comeback today. "Between 1960 and 1964, 
half the circuses in the United States went broke," 
he said. "They began coming back • in the early 
1970's and the period of 1971-73 turned out to be 
the biggest since the heyday of the circus. Last 
year, it was a little slower because of inflation and 
next year may be affected too." He added that tele- 
vision probably killed the circus in the mid 1950's. 
"It was easier to watch television than to drive to 
see a circus," he said. "But people are beginning to 
want to see the real thing and barring something 
like a depression, circuses will return." 

Franzen is counting on that comeback for his 
tour this year, which has been expanded to 240 days. 
In early January, he already had 42 towns com- 
mitted through the work of Elizabeth Bussey, Jeff 
Chalmers and State Sen. Clifford "Tiny" Krueger 
(R-Merrill), who once worked in a circus himself 
as a "fat man." During a stay in their winter quar- 
ters, the show's main semi truck was repainted and 
more gaudy red and gold scrolls were added to the 
sides of another vehicle. 

Despite all the work and an ever-present poten- 
tial for failure, Franzen remains optimistic. "I just 
wanted to try this, so I did," he said. "I was reluc- 
tant; I still know I could blow it all. But I know 
now that I like this enough. Even if I lost it ■ — • and 
I don't intend to — I'd just turn around and I'd 
start over." 

He said that he hopes that the coming tour goes 
alright. "At least we've shown there's- enough public 
interest that we can make it," he said. 












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There's no such thing as a perfect family — • 
except maybe on TV or in the movies, say two 
family therapists at Stout, and as such, every 
family could benefit from counseling. 

Charles Barnard and Ramon Corrales jointly 
supervise a marriage and family counseling ser- 
vice which provides a learning laboratory for 
experienced counselors specializing in marriage 
and family therapy at Stout. 

What began as a casual meeting of two pro- 
fessionals, each maintaining private practices in 
marriage counseling, grew into a certification 
program for marriage and family counselors. The 
pair launched the venture in fall, 1973, with care- 
fully screened students serving as co-therapists. 
The courses were designed with guidelines sup- 
plied by the, American Association of Marriage 
and Family Counselors. 

The young educators hope to expand the pres- 
ent program into a Master's degree, making Stout 
the only institution in the Upper Midwest to offer 
such a degree. 

Barnard and Corrales stress the importance 
of counselor certification since in all but three 
states it is possible for anyone to hang up a 
shingle or advertise in the phone book as a mar- 
riage counselor. 

"In a relatively new field like marriage coun- 
seling, it's easy to think you know what you're 
doing, but you'll find some well-intentioned but 
ill-prepared individuals calling themselves mar- 
riage counselors," Corrales noted. 

Barnard added that although there are many 
similarities between individual and family thera- 
py, there are distinct differences as well. For 
example, an individual therapist could do an ex- 
cellent job with the wife, but unwittingly upset 
the marital balance because of the lack of aware- 
ness of what she is doing to her spouse. 

"We all exist in an environment that contains 
other people and our relationships are interper- 
sonal," Barnard stated. "One individual may only 
be the symptom of problems within the family." 

The pair concur that the emphasis in marriage 
and family counseling is gradually changing from 
crisis intervention to developmental counseling. 
In other words, they place equal importance on 
helping couples overcome discord as helping them 
realize the potential of an already good marriage. 

In addition, premarital counseling, a growing 
trend in marriage therapy, enables couples to gain 



insight into each other as well as to develop the 
necessary skills for a successful marriage. Ob- 
serving that each spouse carries his personal back- 
ground into his marital relationship, Corrales 
summarizes that premarital counseling is largely 
exploring "whether I can synchronize my family 
history with yours." 

The primary emphasis in developmental coun- 
seling is to help husband and wife overcome com- 
munication difficulties which often lead to prob- 
lems with sex, money and in-laws. Both therapists 
firmly believe that any couple could benefit from 
. a marriage "checkup" every two years. 

Barnard and Corrales reject the negative at- 
titude parents have about involving their children 
in therapy or problems between husband and wife. 

"It's like the adage — 'there are no family 
secrets', Perhaps the kids don't know the specific 
content, but they have a 'gut feeling' of what's 
happening," Corr.ales said. 

"If I don't let my kids know what I'm fighting 
about, they are still likely to pick up the emotional 
undercurrent, fantasize and place more guilt and 
responsibility on themselves for causing trouble," 
Barnard said. 

Besides being valuable tools in the session by 
acting as co-therapists and monitoring their par- 
ents' behavior, the children themselves will profit 
from the interpersonal skills they learn there, 
according to Barnard. 

"It's understandable that every family at some 
time faces stressful events which upset rules and 
cause tension. We hope that through counseling 
we can give them skills to use at such' times," 
Barnard explained. 

"The counselor is like a catalyst who works 
on the healing powers a family has," Corrales 
said. "We can look in from the outside and gener- 
ate those forces to make each family member a 
therapist in his own home." 

But the counselor's role goes beyond saving 
marriages. "The title, marriage counselor, carries 
with it the false connotation of keeping marriage 
together as a goal — that people have no use for 
a marriage counselor if they've decided to quit," 
said Barnard. 

"If there's any one point where people need 
counseling, it's when they're discussing the divorce 
question or going through all the considerations 
that go into two people splitting," Corrales added. 




Jeff is a typical looking 10-year-old boy with 
average intelligence. However, his multiple learn- 
ing and behavior problems have caused him to 
function as a retarded child. 

Diagnosed as brain-injured, psychotic and 
severely retarded by a number of professionals, 
Jeff showed hyperactivity, aggressiveness, some- 
times withdrawn behavior and a total inability to 
achieve in school. 

Several months ago Jeff's parents, convinced 
of hidden learning potential in their son, referred 
him to a psychological and educational diagnostic 
center at Stout. After initial evaluation and diag- 
nosis, personnel at' the "Psychoeducational Cen- 
ter" immediately, embarked on a comprehensive' 
program to develop Jeff's full potential. 

Realizing that many behavior symptoms mask- 
ed his true capacity, they designed a behavior 
modification program to eliminate undesirable 
behavior, videotaped Jeff responding to the be- 
havior change technique and taught his parents to 
use the method at home. School personnel adopted 
the technique to employ in maintaining Jeff's at- 
tention in the classroom and were visited and 
consulted frequently by Center workers to assure 
that the program was working. 

While Jeff still comes to the Menomonie facili- 
ty for tutoring and reevaluation, he has made 
great strides in getting along with his peers, is 
better behaved at home, and is currently doing 
third grade work in his special education class. 

"Our success with clients is due to our caring 
atmosphere — our willingness to go above and 
beyond the usual professional competencies," said 
Gust Jenson, director of the Center. 

Jenson explained that many children with 
average or even above average intelligence may 
need help in overcoming learning impairments 
which prevent them from working up to their 
full potential. In some cases, remedial work can 
be expected to last from two to nine years to 
finally overcome a learning disability, a term used 
by school psychologists to describe a form of minor 
brain damage hindering otherwise normal persons 
from reading and learning normally. 

Stout's diagnostic center, operated in conjunc- 
tion with the University's school psychology and 
guidance and counseling majors, was established 
in 1971 to help school-age youngsters with a var- 
iety of problems. In contrast to the usual drab, 
multilevel clinic structures where psychological 
work takes place, Stout's facility provides a unique 



homelike setting. The program has moved into 
a warm red brick building, a former residence, 
with additional space for offices, evaluation, con- 
ference and treatment rooms, a library and a play 
therapy area. 

"Children needing help are usually taken to 
places that look clinical and they develop negative 
associations to them," observed Carol Hogstad, 
one of three faculty supervisors. "We escape that 
institutional look by being able to take the child 
into the kitchen or sitting him on the living room 
carpet. It's a natural setting for observation." 

Referrals to the Center usually come from 
parents whose children have difficulty adjusting 
socially, academically and emotionally in school 
or are causing behavior problems at home. Most 
clients come from within a 60-mile radius, but a 
few travel farther. 

Each child is seen by a team including at least 
one faculty supervisor and a school psychology 
clinician doing advanced level studies. The super- 
visors themselves are licensed school psycholo- 
gists, while the additional staff workers come 
from backgrounds in child development, teaching, 
speech pathology or counseling. 

"We have the advantage of getting an in-depth 
view of the child and his evolving development 
rather than being limited to an artificial, con- 
strained environment," remarked Cal Stoudt, a 
program supervisor. "And with our differing 
backgrounds, we often find ourselves looking at 
cases and constantly raising new issues in diag- 
nosis and treatment." 

Treatment includes conference with the child's 
parents, followed by a series of psychological and 
educational tests for the child. The staff then 
formulates a program to remedy the identified 
problemk Substantial improvement has been 
shown when clinicians and staff members have 
been able to work directly with the child rather 
than simply prescribing a program to be carried 
out at school or in the home. 

Jenson believes there are few, if any, similar 
university-based facilities in the state to which 
parents can turn for help in meeting a variety of 
problems ranging from aiding a child's social 
adjustment in nursery school to counseling an 
adolescent drug addict. He stressed that the 
Center provides no quick formulas to success but 
that dedication, determination and warmth point 
the way to progress in overcoming problem pat- 
terns in children. 




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Restaurant and a Fim 



Stout students have long been challenged to 
apply the theoretical knowledge they acquire in the 
classroom to the practical world of work. Two new 
challenges are being issued this semester in the 
form of an experimental restaurant facility and a 
boutique, open on the third floor of the University's 
Home Economics building. 

Both facilities replace temporary quarters oc- 
cupied by students in hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment, fashion merchandising and clothing, textiles 
and design. 

Known as "Corner-3," the experimental restaur- 
ant replaces the old Amon House, where hotel and 
restaurant management students have been pre- 
paring and serving meals for the past four years. 
"The Niche," a boutique operated by students in 
fashion merchandising and in clothing, textiles and 
design, is an expansion of earlier operations first 
known as "The Bottom Drawer" and later "Our 
Place." 

Tom Bloom, an instructor for the hotel and res- 
taurant management program, said that "Corner-3" 
serves a specialized fare four nights a week, empha- 
sizing moderately priced gourmet dining. "The ma- 
jority of the food we serve will not be available any- 
where between Chicago and Minneapolis," Bloom 
said. 



Jerry DeBoer, an instructor in the Department 
of Apparel, Textiles and Design, who teaches stu- 
dents that run the boutique, said the original opera- 
tion was started in the basement of the former 
K-Bliss Men's Shop and was known as "The Bottom 
Drawer." It was moved to the first floor of the 
Home Economics building in 1973 and renamed 
"Our Place." According to DeBoer, one of the rea- 
sons for the move and name change is the boutique 
has expanded the kind of merchandise it offers. Pre- 
viously, sales were limited to hand-crafted items 
sold for local artisans on a consignment basis. Al- 
though continuing with that arrangement, the bou- 
tique will now handle merchandise obtained from 
wholesalers by students on professional buying trips. 

All work at the boutique is done by seniors en- 
rolled in a special "Fashion Merchandise Practicum" 
course. 

"Corner-3" is staffed by students from various 
hotel and restaurant management classes. The even- 
ing meal, which includes cocktails and imported 
wine service, draws students from courses in "Bar 
Management," "Integrated Management Systems," 
and "Restaurant Operational Management." 

Bloom noted that patrons can expect unusual 
touches at their evening meal. For example, all ser- 
vice, from the trays to the teapots, is silver. Waiters 




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Tom Bloom (foreground in far upper left photo), in- 
structor for hotel and restaurant management, introduces 
some of the student staff, ivho will be running "Corner-3," 
a new experimental restaurant facility on campus. . At 
left, one of the student managers at the restaurant serves 
Kathy Mork, Menomonie. 

Across the hall, Gail Wajek (above left), Cornell, ar- 







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Illis 













ranges a display of handbags at "The: Niche," a boutique 
operated by students majoring in fashion merchandising 
and in clothing, textiles and design. 

Instructor Jerry DeBoer (above right) demonstrates 
proper merchandising display techniques for students. 

Both "The Niche" and "Corner-3" are located on the 
third floor of Stout's new Home Economics building. 



Boutique Opening 




us 



and waitresses are garbed in black tie and formals. 
Different kinds of services are available, depend- 
ing on the number of people at a table, and the 
type of meals ordered. However, Bloom said that 
the menu consists of strictly elegant dining at its 
best. Cost to the customer is rather reasonable, 
since it only covers price of food and expenses. All 
labor is performed as part of course work by 
students. Typical items may include Coq au vin 
Champenois, which is chicken and pearl onions in 
champagne; Sole aux Noodles will feature fillet of 
sole in a heavy cream with a hollandaise sauce serv- 
ed on a bed of noodles; and Entrocotte with Bercy 
Butter is beef fillet with a specially prepared butter 
served on an artichoke bottom. 

Exotic vegetables which cross the finely attired 
tables include Cauliflower au Gratin and Tomato 
Provencale, which is tomatoes sauteed and broiled, 
topped with cheese, bread crumbs and garlic. Bloom 
also promises a variety of European pastries, fresh 
fruit turnovers and other special dishes to cap the 
meal. After-dinner cordials are available. 

Both the restaurant- and the boutique are designed 
to give students an authentic view of the fields of 
work for which they are preparing. That's the 
reason that DeBoer switched from a strictly con- 
signment operation. "We wanted a more realistic 



situation with students going out into the market 
and purchasing," DeBoer said. He added that the 
name "The Niche" represents the students' niche in 
the business world. 

Bloom pointed out that while his operation pro- 
vides practical training it is for management-level 
jobs, not for chefs or waiters. "What I am doing is 
by no means training chefs," he said. "They're 
working on departmental levels in a food service 
operation. We're showing all the different depart- 
ments within an operation. When the students get 
into industry as managers, they will have an under- 
standing of the different areas they are supervising 
and can identify with these different departments." 

DeBoer's boutique uses a similar approach with 
students rotating positions such as personnel direc- 
tor, advertising and sales promotion director, mar- 
keting, receiving and office manager, assistant man- 
ager and manager. They must also function a mini- 
mum of 50 hours as sales people. "The manager's 
responsibility is to delegate," DeBoer said. "Stu- 
dents report to the manager, not to me, the instruc- 
tor. They learn to take orders from each other." 

He said the students are responsible for opening 
and closing the shop each day and to take care of 
their banking. 



Class Notes 



1921-1951 

AXEL J. RISE '21, St. Paul, con- 
tinues to do substitute teaching since 
retiring nine years ago. He previously 
taught for 47 years in the St. Paul 
area. 

GRACE QUARTERS PETERSON 

'32, Duluth, Minn., is the public rela- 
tions and program services director 
for the Girl Scouts. 

HAROLD ZASTROW '35, Minne- 
apolis, has retired after 25 years in 
the packaging department at Hoemer 
Waldorf Corp. 

STUART A. ANDERSON '35, 
Loami, 111., is professor of administra- 
tion at Sangamon State University. 

Since his retirement from the U.S. 
Marine Corps in 1966, JAMES R. 
EINUM'36, Carlsbad, Calif., has spent 
part of each year in Hawaii and Cali- 
fornia. 

WAYNE BS '39, MS '51 and THEL- 
MA HAAYA POOL '39 reside in Mil- 
waukee where he is principal at Carle- 
ton Elementary School. 

FRED O. '39 and WILMA BUNGE 
BLAIR '40 are at home in Hale, Mich. 
He retired in 1971 after 24 years as 
corporate' • operating superintendent 
for J. I. Hudson Co., Detroit. 

GORDON SNOEYENBOS '46 is pre- 
sident and owner of Vega Enterprises, 
Inc. He and his wife MARY (RU- 
DOW) '49 reside in Decatur, 111. 

JUNE EDEBERG MADDEN '48, 
Mount Prospect, 111., is director of 
dietetics at Mc Henry Hospital in Mc 
Henry. 

NORMAN MITBY MS '49, Madison, 
is district director of Madison Area 
Technical College. He was listed in 
"Who's Who in America" in 1974. 

WARREN EISETH '50, Gillett, is 
assistant administrator for Gillett 
public schools. His wife KAREN 
(NIELSEN) '50 teaches home econo- 
mics. 

ROBERT G. CHRISTIANSON '50 
Palacios, Tex., is an electronics tech- 
nician with the Federal Aviation Ad- 
ministration. Currently, he is attach- 
ed to the Corpus Christi Airways 
facilities sector office. 

WARREN E. PHILLIPS '50, Excel- 
sior, Minn., has been named director 
of the Dunwoody Day School in Min- 
neapolis. 

JOHN RANTALA '51 is finishing 
his fourth year as a member of the 
University of Hawaii faculty serving 
under contract to the USAID Mission 
in Laos. His team develops textbooks, 
curriculum and trains instructors. 
Both he and his wife plan to be in 
Vientiane, Laos, until mid 1976. 



1956-1959 

RON BS '56, MS '68 and SARA 
RHIEL WILHELM '63, Madison, have 
opened a stretch and sew fabric store. 

STAN SUK BS '57, MS '58, Newark, 
Calif., is superintendent of documen- 
tation and training for Diablo Sys- 
tems, Inc., Sunnyvale, Calif. His wife 
MARY (REZEK) '58 is food service 
director for the San Leandro Unified 
School District and has been elected 
treasurer of the Northern California 
School Food Service Association. 

Distinguished Alumni 







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Hansen 



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Mrs. Topinka 



La Verne M. Hansen, Kala- 
mazoo, Mich., and Beverly Peter- 
son Topinka, Wausau, were hon- 
ored as "Distinguished Alumni" 
award recipients during winter 
commencement exercises. 

Hansen is director of area en- 
gineering and plant mainten- 
ance at The Upjohn Co.; Mrs. 
Topinka is an extension home 
economist for Lincoln County. 
Hansen has held key manage- 
ment posts in industry and has 
made many contributions to the 
field of plant engineering. He 
is now responsible for all plant 
maintenance activities for the 
corporat ; on, directing the work 
of 320 engineers and craftsmen, 
in addition to corporate real es- 
tate, maintenance training and 
cost control. 

Mrs. Topinka originated the 
American Dairy Association 
'.'Dairy Bake-off" television pro- 
gram, now aired throughout the 
state. She has developed tele- 
vision programming related to 
home economists and authors a 
weekly column, published in sev- 
eral eastern Wisconsin news- 
papers. 



VIRGINIA VICK CAHOW '58, New 
Brighton, Minn., teaches homemaking 
at Oakgrove High School. 



MAURICE MS '58 and HELEN 
BALDWIN GUPTILL MS '58 reside 
in Tucson, Ariz. Both are employed 
with Tucson public schools. He is co- 
ordinator of industrial arts educa- 
tion, and she teaches junior high 
scisucB. 

KAY SEYFORTH SMITH '58 re- 
sides with her husband and two 
daughters in Evansville. She is em- 
ployed as a secretary. 

CATHERINE BLUM PETERSON 
BS '59, MS '74, New Richmond, is 
employed by the Somerset public 
schools. 

DORA ARAMORI OKAZAKI '59, 
Hilo, Hawaii, has retired from teach- 
ing. She is now owner/manager 'of 
the Lehua Anthurium Nursery in Hilo. 

PETER BS '59, MS '60 and DOR- 
OTHY WALTER SCHNEIDER '60 
are at home in Wisconsin Rapids. He 
is chairman of the Department of In- 
dustrial Arts and a machine shop 
instructor at Lincoln High School. 
She teaches clothing in adult evening' 
classes at Mid-State Technical Insti- 
tute. 

EDWARD BURTON MS '59, Buck- 
eye, Ariz., is a consultant for West- 
side Area Career Occupation Project 
(WA.COP). He works for some 80 
schools in western Maricopa County. 

MYRNA SHEARER '59, North 
Branch, Minn., has been promoted to 
associate professor at the University 
of Minnesota. A member of the Na- 
tional. Association of Extension Home 
Economists, she has been named to a 
national committee. 

HARRY MILLER '59, Neenah, has 
been elected county supervisor of 
Winnebago County. 

CLARENCE L. HEYEL MS '59, 
Glassboro, N.J., has recently been ap- 
pointed assistant to the vice-president, 
Office of Career Education, Glassboro 
State College. 

1960-1964 

JOHN S. SHERRY '60, Lafayette, 
Calif., has been promoted to general 
manager at Ohio Medical Products in 
Richmond, Calif. 

M. R. BACHLER BS '60, MS '61, 
Murfreesboro, Tenn., is departmental 
supervisor of student teachers at Mid- 
dle Tennessee State University. 

WAYNE TOWNE '60, West Allis, 
is a teacher at Milwaukee Tech High 
School. 

BRUCE '61 and KARLA HANKE 
OLANDER '61 reside with their two 
children in Oxnard, Calif. He teaches 
industrial arts at Thousand Oaks High 
School. She is a quality control an- 
alyst for Venture County Department 
of Social Welfare. 

ROBERT PAPAS '61, Minnetonka, 
Minn., has recently been promoted to 
program coordinator at Suburban 
Hennepin County Area Vocational- 
Technical Schools. 



As a member of the Educational 
Professional Development Act 552 Na- 
tional Resource panel, DONALD L. 
CLARK BS '61, MS '62, Bryan, Tex., 
participated in a vocational education 
study seminar in England, Prance, 
Sweden and Russia. 

RICHARD J. SEITZ '61 has been 
promoted to senior staff specialist 
in the management and organization 
development department of General 

Motors Institute in Flint, Mich. At 
home with his wife and three chil- 
dren in Grand Blanc, Mich. 

DAVID BS '62, MS '67 and PATRI- 
CIA WENNER REISINGER BS '61, 
MS '67 are at home in Manitowoc. He 
is vocational coordinator for River- 
view School, and she is programming 
adult evening classes for Lakeshore 
Technical Institute. 

JULIE THOMPSON MARTIN '62, 
Rialto, Calif., heads the San Bernar- 
dino Valley College home economics 
department and is the instructor of a 
televised college course entitled, "In- 
ternational Foods." 

Former head of a Minnesota voca- 
tional education school district for the 
handicapped, CHARLES F. WROBEL 
'62 has been appointed to the Na- 
tional Advisory Committee to the Sec- 
retary of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare. 

JOYCE KRAETSCH SCHULTERS 

'62, Allenton, teaches senior high 
home economics at Washington High 
School in Germantown. She is also 
the department chairman. 

Maj. ALLAN M. DICKSON '62, sta- 
tioned at L, G. Hanscom AFB, Mass., 
has earned the Meritorious Service 
Medal for his professional skill, 
knowledge and leadership as a develop- 
ment engineer. 

RICHARD BS '62, MS '72 and 
CORA MILLIKIN AYERS *73 are at 
home in Barron with their four sons. 
He is a vocational coordinator, em- 
ployed by CESA No. 4, and she is a 
dietary consultant. 

JERRY BIESE BS '63, MS '64, ex- 
ecutive director of the Career Develop- 
ment Center, Eau Claire, has been 
elected 1976 president of the Wis- 
consin Rehabilitation Association. He 
is serving as president-elect during 
1975. 

CHARLES W. WILLIAMS '63, an 
employe of Reserve Mining, has been 
promoted to maintenance engineer. He 
resides with his wife and two sons in 
Babbitt, Minn. 

THOMAS FREIWALD BS '64, MS 
'68, Saginaw, Mich., is associate pro- 
fessor of architectural technology at 
Delta College, University Center, 
Mich. His wife JOYCE (ZIEGLER) 
'65 also teaches at Delta on a part- 
time basis. 



1965-1967 

HENRY WINTERFELDT BS '65, 
MS '69, has received his Ph.D. in in- 
structional technology in education 
communication from UW-Madison. He 
teaches at UW-Oshkosh. 

Currently serving as president-elect 
of the Wisconsin Dietetic Association 
is ZETA GILBERTSON HICKS '65, 
Madison. 

Employed by Allis-Chalmers Foun- 
dry, TERRENCE HERNESMAN '65, 
Oak Creek, is now manager of quality 
assurance and manufacturing engin- 
eering. 

HOWARD W. BS '65, MS '66 and 
CHRISTINE PRIDEAUX GYGAX '66 
are now at home in Beaver Dam where 
he is an electronics instructor for 
CESA No. 13. 

JOSEPH ROSSMEIER '65, Mc Lean, 
Va., is coordinator of institutional re- 
search at Northern Virginia Com- 
munity College. 

GERALD RADEMACHER '66, Bris- 
tol, Conn., is employed as a sales re- 
presentative with Danbury Printing 
and Litho. 

STUART L. RUBNER BS '66, MS 
'67, Stratford, Conn., has received his 
Ph.D. in counseling and guidance. He 
is employed as an assistant professor 
in the Division of Counseling and 
School Psychology at Fairfield Uni- 
versity. 

TERRANCE HICKMAN BS '67, MS 
'68, Ventura, Calif., recently received 
his Doctorate of Education degree in 
the field of psychology at Brigham 
Young University. 

ELAINE STEELE VELONIS '67, 
Richmond Hill, N.Y., is manager of a 
high school cafeteria there. 

ANTHONY SCHWALLER MS '67, 
Charleston, 111., is on a leave of ab- 
sence from Eastern Illinois University 
to pursue his Doctorate degree. 

KATHLEEN WACKER MATHWIG 
'67, Sheboygan Falls, assisted in the 
developing and teaching of a new 
course entitled, "Homemaking Skill 
Development," at the Sheboygan Re- 
habilitation Center. 

JACK BS '67, MS '68 and SHARON 
HAPL LORENZ '67 are at home in 
Palatine, 111. He teaches drafting and 
coaches varsity football, gymnastics 
and baseball at Niles North High 
School. 

MICHELE S. GROVER '67, Temple 
Hills, Md., is the assistant district 
manager of the Camp Springs, Md., 
Social Security District office. 

ELVA HARRISON '67, Eugene, 
Ore., is employed as a food service 
supervisor at the University of Oregon 
dormitories. 

SALLY OLSON '67 has a new job. 
She is employed by the Butterick 
Fashion Marketing Co., as an educa- 
tional representative. She travels 
throughout the United States present- 
ing programs to home economics 



teachers. At home in Culver City, 
Calif. 



1968-1970 

LESLIE HAIGHT '68, Clarkston, 
Mich., is an instructor at Chrysler 
Corp.'s Automotive Education Center 
in Livonia, Mich. He is also currently 
treasurer of the Detroit Metropolitan 
Stout Alumni Association. 

ROBERT BS '68, MS '69 and MAR- 
GARET MULLEN REYNOLDS '69 

are at home in Grafton. She has re- 
cently been appointed supervisor in 
the Business office at Northpoint Me- 
dical Group, Ltd., Milwaukee. 

MICHAEL LITTEKEN '68 is a sen- 
ior engineer with the Viking Fire Pro- 
tection Co., Peoria, 111., where he re- 
sides. 

ROGER E. PELKEY '68 recently re- 
ceived a Master of Arts degree from 
East Tennessee State University. 

ERVIN R. BANES, JR. BS '68, MS 
'73, Wauwatosa, has been named su- 
pervisor of facilities and planning for 
the Milwaukee Public Schools. 

ROBERTA A. ANDERSON BS '68, 
MS '69, Mankato, Minn., has received 
a Distinguished Achievement Award 
for Excellence in Teacher Education 
from the American Association of 
Colleges for Teacher Eduction. She is 
currently serving as home economics 
coordinator for The Children's House, 
a model home economics teacher edu- 
cation facility. 

At home in Carpentersville, 111., are 
DAVID '68 and SHIRLEY FRED- 
RICH BONOMO '67. He is a coopera- 
tive education instructor at Dundee 
High School, and she is a coordinator 
at Forest View High School in Ar- 
lington Heights. 

JAMES CONLEY III '68, Chicago, 
has been promoted to general sales 
manager for ARA Food Services Co., 
Midwest area. 

SUSAN LAUER '68, Lisle, 111., is 
the mid-central regional director of 
General Electric and Hotpoint Con- 
sumer Institute. 

Capt. JACKIE L. TONN '68 is a 
pilot on the B-52 bomber crew repre- 
senting the 410th Bomb Wing at K. I. 
Sawyer AFB, Mich. 

Airman RHODA J. CRAIG '69 has 

been assigned to K. I. Sawyer AFB, 
Mich., following her graduation with 
honors from the medical service 
specialist course at Sheppard AFB, 
Tex. 

JUDY KRAUSE BS '70, MS '74 is 
the new child, adolescent and family 
counselor at the Lincoln County Health 
Care Center in Merrill. 

DAN KANN '70, Rice Lake, is an 
auto body instructor at the Indian- 
head Technical Institute. 



10 



A new face in the Juneau County 
Home Extension office is EILEEN 
CHRISTENSON BS '70, MS '74, Mau- 
ston, who is acting home agent. 

RONALD J. VELICH '70, Wausau, 
was recently appointed sales engineer- 
ing draftsman for Wausau Homes, 
Inc. 

CURTIS W. PETERS '70 has been 
promoted to packaging system spe- 
cialist at the technical center at 
Owens-Illinois, Inc., Toledo, Ohio. 

JOYCE HARDTKE '70, Manawa, is 
teaching home economics at Manawa 
High School. 

LEE E. GEHRKE '70, Alma, is, a 
Lt. (jg) USN aboard the Navy's new- 
est aircraft carrier, the USS John P. 
Kennedy. He is an aircraft mainten- 
ance officer. 

JOHN A. PARKER BS '70, MS '71, 
Kodiak, Alaska, teaches auto me- 
chanics at Kodiak High School and 
night classes at Kodiak Community 
College. His wife DELORES (MC 
CULLICK) '71 does substitute teach- 
ing. 

GARY L. '70 and BARBARAYANG- 
DON SIVERTSEN '70 are at home in 
Tacoma, Wash. He is director of 
learning resources at the Port Steila- 
coom Community College. 

1971-1972 

ARDALA LITTLEPIELD '71, Hay- 
ward, is a home economist with the 
University Extension in Tomahawk. 

JAMES C. GREGERSEN '71, Ra- 
cine, has recently been promoted to 
plant engineer at Acme Die Casting 
Corp. 

SHIRLEY A. HEICHEL '71, Foun- 
tain City, has completed her dietetic 
internship and is employed as a city 
dietitian for the Maternal and Child 
Health Bureau in Minneapolis. 

PRANK '71 and CHRIS BTHIELKE 
BRAISKE '70 are at home in Lake- 
wood where they own and operate a 
service station and garage. 

MARIANNA ZAKRZEWSKI '71, 
Arlington Heights, 111., is a flight at- 
tendant with American Airlines. 

JOHN PETERSON '71, player/ 
coach of Athletes in Action's East 
wrestling team, headquartered in Lan- 
caster, Pa., has an undefeated 5-0 
season, both as a team and as an in- 
dividual wrestler. He has also won 
first place ratings at several tourna- 
ments in the area. 

RONALD J. OLSON '72, Oakwood, 
Ohio, is working with VISTA in the 
field of adult education. 

JAMES L. REETZ '72, is stationed 
in Okinawa with the U.S. Army. 

JAMES MAAS '72, has a new posi- 
tion with the Bloomington, Minn., Pub- 
lic School -System as an audio-visual 
coordinator. This past summer he at- 
tended the Library College at the 
University of Minnesota. 

BRUCE LINGSWEILER, '72, Ra- 
cine, is employed by Pheasant Run in 
the sales area, St. Charles, 111. 



A teacher of woods, metals and 
power mechanics at North Salem High 
School is CHARLES SYMON III, '72. 
He resides in Bedford Hills, N.Y. 

A new instructor at Black Hawk 
College, Moline, III, is PAMELA 
FIEBER '72. She teaches retail man- 
agement-fashion merchandising there, 

GERALD '72 and DONNA STIBBE 
SIMS BS '69, MS '72 are both teach- 
ing at the New Richland Middle 
School. He has developed a new in- 
dustrial arts program, and she teach- 
es home economics. They reside in 
Richland Center with their daughter. 

HENRY L. WEIDLICH '72 is em- 
ployed as assistant manager at the 
Broker Restaurant in Denver, where 

JEFFREY KLAUSER, '72, Sheboy- 
gan, is employed as a sales trainee 
with the distribution division of 
Georgia-Pacific Corp. 

FOSTER STEVE LAWYER '72 has 
recently joined Marriott Hotel Cor- 
poration in Bloomington, Minn., in 
sales and catering. 

Working at Pako Corporation in 
Minneapolis is LYNN STREETER, 
'72, New Hope. 

DONALD ERCHMAN '72, Algoma, 
is teaching industrial arts at the high 
school there. 

DEAN A. STREHLAU '72, Lake- 
wood, Colo., has been promoted to 
assistant production coordinator with 
Wood Brothers Homes, Colorado's 
largest Jiomebuilder.. 

LYNN ANNE KOCA '72, White 
Plains, N.Y., is the new assistant 
manager of food service for Burke 
Rehabilitation Center of the Marriott 
Corp. 

MARTHA BOKEMEIER MILLER 
'72, Elizabeth, 111., is employed as an 
extension adviser for the University 
of Illinois Cooperative Extension Ser- 
vice. 

BILL BURMESCH '72, St. Louis 
Park, Minn., has been promoted to in- 
bound supervisor for Briggs Trans- 
portation Co., St. Paul. 

1973 

RONALD T. PETIT was recently 
awarded a Master of Arts degree in 
education at the University of Iowa, 
Iowa City. 

JOHN DEBEE, Menomonie, is at- 
tending Pillsbury Bible College, Owa- 
tonna, Minn. 

STEWART L. GILMORE, Des 
Plaines, 111., has been appointed to 



The Stout Alumnus 

The Stout Alumnus is an official publi- 
cation of University of Wisconsin-Stout. 
It is published quarterly. 

John K. Enger Editor 

Judy Olson Ass't. to the Editor 

The Stout Alumnus is distributed to 
graduates, friends and faculty of the 
University. It is entered at the post 
office in Menomonie, Wis., as third 
class matter. 
Jack Wile Alumni Director 



direct the food and vending machine 
services for the Canteen Corp., Chi- 
cago. 

AL GMEINDER, Indianapolis, Ind., 
is manager of The Ground Round. 

RAYMOND L. PRICE, Sheboygan, 
is an industrial arts instructor at 
Sheboygan North High School. 

VIRGIL SCHIEFFER, White Bear 
Lake, Minn., is a sales engineer with 
Standard Conveyor of St. Paul. His 
wife JANET (SCHLEUSNER) '69 is 
a substitute teacher. 

MICHAEL J. GAGNER, Superior, 
is teaching in the marketing depart- 
ment at Indianhead Technical Insti- 
tute. 

TOM VANDERLOOP, Stillwater, 
Minn., is employed as a design en- 
gineer with Kroy Industries. 

RICHARD J. REED, Grafton, 
teaches auto shop at Grafton High 
School. 

JOHN and JILL TRYCINSKI 
GARDNER '72 are at home in Oak 
Creek. He is supervisor for the Mil- 
waukee division of Great Northern 
Plastics. 

ROBERT PULLMAN BS '73, MS 
'74, Lindenwold, N.J., is a work sam- 
ple specialist at the Vocational Re- 
search Institute in Philadelphia, Pa. 
He is conducting research on a work 
sample battery for the blind or visual- 
ly impaired. 

KATHY DAMON, Madison, is teach- 
ing preschool special education at 
Kiddie Camp. 

JAMES HITTMAN, Apple Valley, 
Minn., is an instructor at Thermo King 
Corp., Bloomington, Minn. His wife 
LAURIE (DROSSART) teaches home 
economics at Rosemount Middle 
School. 

1974 

CHERYL KLUSSENDORF, North 
Prairie, is teaching at Kettle Marine 
Schools. 

JOANN TAPPA, Owatonna, Minn., 
is teaching at North Junior High 
there, 

JOY PETERSON MS is a guidance 
intern at Tomahawk High School. 

RON MICHAELIS, Milwaukee, is 
employed as a cost and scheduling 
engineer for Fluor Engineers and Con- 
structors of Los Angeles. 

Teaching at Arcadia High School, 
Rochester, N.Y., is EUGENE BLAIR. 

SEAN HADE, Milwaukee, is em- 
ployed with Fidelity Union Life In- 
surance Co. 

BARBARA MC GINNIS writes us 
from Brazil, where she will be spend- 
ing the next two years with the Peace 
Corps. She states much satisfaction 
results from helping others and is 
grateful for the education and train- 
ing she received at Stout. 

SHARON RAE BRANDT, South 
Beloit, 111., is employed as a foods 
instructor at Aldrich High School, Be- 
loit. 



Marriages 



1967-1971 

Patricia Mc Neil to RAYMOND 
A. KINDSCHY '67, last fall, in Elk- 
horn. 

Cecelia Hissong to RAY KRUGER 
'68, June 15. 

Maryellen Peterson to ROBERT L. 
ELLISON '69, Aug. 31, in Sturgeon 
Bay. 

Kathryn Sundberg to TORREY P. 
JOHNSON '69, last fall, in Superior. 

DAWN ULLMAN '70 to Randall 
Overbeck, Oct. 12, in Kolberg. 

COLLEEN FITZPATRICK '71 to 
Stephen Sylvester, Sept. 21, in Wau- 
sau. 

Shirley J. Thompson to JIM ZIM- 
MERMAN '71, June 15. 

1972-1973 

LINDA R. JOCHIMSEN '72 to 
THOMAS J. VANDERLOOP '73, last 
fall. 

MURIEL WICKMAN '72 to WAL- 
TER STOLTZMAN '70, Oct. 12, in 
Forest Lake, Minn. 

Debra Dahmer to CURT JOHNSON 
'72, last June. 

Kathryn Shestak to DANIEL L. 
WALDVOGEL '72, Oct. 26, in Antigo. 

Catherine Dhuey to CHARLES J. 
SCHMITT '72, Oct. 26, in Lincoln. 

Deborah Good to DEAN F. EH- 
LERS '73, June 1.- 

Suzanne Vircks to GLENN A. 
GOESSL '73, Sept. 21, in Stetsonville. 

MARIE SALO '73 to FRANK 
FRYER '73, Nov. 18, 1973. 

ROSEMARY ANN HILDEBRAND 
'73 to Christopher Parker, July 20, 
in Gibbsville. 

Kerry Lee Quinnell to PAUL J. 
BAUER '73, June 15. 

LORRAINE PETERSON '73 to 
Lyle Byersdorff, last fall, in Prentice. 

YVONNE DOOLITTLE '73 to RO- 
BERT MAYER '73, Aug. 3, in Ells- 
worth. 

1974 

KLAUDIA RAE KLINNER to RO- 
BERT E. HOLLANDER, JR., Sept. 7, 
in Aniwa. 

DEBORAH M. JACHIM to DALE 
P. RECHNER, Sept. 13, in Anchorage, 
Alaska. 

Paula Torres to STEVEN C. PE- 
TERSON, Sept. 21. 

Patricia Ibe to DANIEL SCHMITZ, 
Sept. 28, in Sheboygan. 

Karen Ann Zemski to JOEL L. 
LEVANDOSKI, Oct. 5, in Marathon. 

Kim Hocking to ANWER HUSSAIN 
MS, Aug. 19, in Tomahawk. 



JOAN M. NIELSEN to Robert 
Turner, Sept. 1, in Racine. 

CAROL S. LUND to MICHEL VAN 
DE BOGERT '73, June 1, in Minneapo- 
lis. 

MARY JANE PEMPEK to JAMES 
SCHUCHARDT, Sept. 21, in Hawkins. 

Janet Oeldrich to THOMAS E. 
JONES, June 29. 



BBS . |S 

srths 



1966-1969 

A daughter, Tanya Lynn, Mar. 9, 
1974, to THOMAS '66 and CAROL 
CASEY SAUTEBIN '67, De Pere. He 
teaches industrial arts at Green Bay 
East High School. 

A son, Matthew Phillip, Feb. 21, 
1974, to Donald and JEAN MARIE 
PIECHOWSKI '66, Franklin. 

A daughter, Shelly Jean, Dec. 15, to 
RICHARD '67 and JOYCE WRASSE 
STELTER '68, Chippewa Falls. He 
teaches high school graphic arts. 

A daughter, Kristine Marie, Dec. 5, 
to Mr. and Mrs. NORM KURSZEW- 
SKI '68, Waukegan, 111. He is employ- 
ed by American Family Insurance and 
was named top agent for 1974 by his 
company. 

A second son, Brent Peter, Mar.. 11, 
1974, to Peter and DIANNE NEY 
TOTTEN '68, Black Creek. 

A son, Brian, Mar. 15, 1974, to 
JOHN '68 and PAT KOEPER SCH- 
RUM '66, Malone. 

A daughter, Sarah Jane, Sept. 13, to 
Royce and CAROL JANE PALOMBI 
SCHULTZ BS '68, MS '72, Whitewater. 

A second daughter, Kathryn Ann, 
Dec. 18, to WARREN '69 and ALICE 
L. BENNINGHOFF SHOBE '69, 
Greenville, Tex. He is personnel man- 
ager and safety and training admin- 
istrator for Wing Industries, Inc. 

A daughter, Melinda Kay, Mar. 15, 
1974, to Ken and DONNA STELZER 
GRABARSKI '69, Eau Claire. 

1970-1974 

A son, Albert David, Nov. 15, to 
ALBERT J. '70 and CHRISTINE 
GROESSEL PIONKE '70, Salem. 

A daughter, Lisa Renee, Sept. 29, 
to Robert and PENNY GRUENE- 
WALD KING '70, in Roseville, Minn. 

A daughter, Alicia Kris, Sept, 7, 
to JOSEPH '70 and LYNDA LORENZ 
STOUT '69, Des Moines, la. 

A son, Todd Allen, Mar. 20, 1974, to 
JAN '70 and HELEN ALTON KICH- 
EFSKI '70, Manitowoc. 

A son, Christopher Erik, March 31, 
1974, to Mr. and Mrs. RICHARD K\ 
MARTEN '70, Wisconsin Rapids. He 
is an industrial arts teacher at West 
Junior High. 



11 

A daughter, Amy Marie, Nov. 12, to 
Chet and CAROL KISCHEL VIER 
'71, Menomonie. 

A son, Aaron John, Feb. 10, 1974, 
to THOMAS '71 and BARBARA 
SCHWARZ MAY '71, Oconomowoc. 
He is employed by Falk Corp. of Mil- 
waukee, as a senior programmer. 

A second son, Eric Mathew, Feb. 
19, 1974, to Mr. and Mrs. MICHAEL 
CHERVENY BS '71, MS '74, West 
Bend. 

A son, Joseph Paul, Apr. 23, 1973, 
to Mr. and Mrs. DONALD HAMIL- 
TON MS '71, Louisville, Ky. 

A daughter, Apr. 1, to ROBERT G. 
'72 and YVONNE SCHROEDER 
KUTCHER '69, Austin, Minn. 

A daughter, Erin Claire, Nov. 5, to 
EDWARD A. '72 and MARTHA SCO- 
VILLE ANDERSON '72, Oshkosh. He 
teaches at Oshkosh West High School. 

A daughter, Kristin, to Mr. and 
Mrs. KENNETH HANNEMANN '74, 
St. Paul. He is a designer for Aero 
Systems Engineering. 



Deaths 



DEAN MC DONALD Dip. '02, 91, 
Nov. 18, in Cosa Mesa, Calif. 

ELLEN DAGGETT '12, Feb. 23, 
1974, in South Pasadena, Calif. 

RACHEL HARRIS CUNNING- 
HAM Dip. '15, Janesville, recently. 

HERBERT FROGNER Dip. '16, 81, 
Dec. 12, in Northville, Mich. 

MARY HOLLISTER STACEY Dip. 
'16, Oct. 5. 

WILLIAM L. HAGEN '23, Aug. 29, 
in Cedar Rapids, la. 

MAUREEN J. KELLEY MOEDE, 
26, Cedarburg, Dec. 28, from an aortic 
aneurysm. She attended Stout for 
three years and was the wife of 
RONALD J. MOEDE '71, a teacher 
in Cedarburg. Both spent two years 
(1971-73) teaching in Ethiopia with 
the Peace Corps. 

CHARLES L. POZZINI Dip, '27, BS 
'34, 70, Dec. 13, in Florida. 

MABEL OTTESON '34, Jan. 15, at 
Luther Hospital in Eau Claire. 

JOHN SHERWOOD MS '70, July 12, 
Oakfield. 

BONNIE SCHANSBERG '74, Blair, 
Nov. 27, in Goulburn, New South 
Wales, Australia, from injuries re- 
ceived in a fall from ' a horse. She 
taught home economics in Goulburn. 



Harold R. Cooke, 80, Oct. 11, of 
a heart attack at Methodist Hos- 
pital, Rochester, Minn. Founder 
of Stout's music department, 
which he headed from 1934 to 
1949. After a 14-year absence, 
he returned to Stout in 1963 as 
director of ..Symphonic Singers 
until his retirement in 1972. 



12 



They're Mai© 
Girl Scouts!? 

'-,; -; Brownie Troop, . No. 259 
has anew look these days, 
Two of : its leaders r are col-, 
lege men. John Lamirande 
and Jim Nichols, both stu- 
dents at:Stout, have taken .-- 
the Girl Scout oath and are 
now full-fledged members, 
filling the role of Brownie 
leaders. 

"What . started out - as a 
, "crazy idea'' has now be- 
come' a meaningful experi- 
ence for the .pair,- who. ex- 
plained that in order to be- 
come a Brownie leader; you 
must first become a Girl 
Scout.; : '■','. 

Nichols, a : sophomore 
from Tomahawk, said; he 
got the idea from his girl 
friend who: has served as a 
scout leader. He invited 
Lamirande, a freshman 
from. Minneapolis, who lives 
on the same dormitory 
floor, to attend an organi- 
zational meeting with him. 




Lamirande (left) ancl Nichols with their troop 



Nichols, who is preparing 
to become an industrial arts 
teacher, feels that the ex- 
perience will help him pre- 
pare for his career. He 
said that he is learning to 
motivate young people, 
which will be an important 



part of his job as a teacher, 
v Lamirande, who/is study- 
ing industrial -technology, 
sees no particular advant- 
age to his major but says 
he enjoys the experience be- 
cause he's "used to being 
around little kids" at home. 




Non-Profit Org. 

U.S. Postage Paid 

Menomonie, Wis. 

Permit No. 3 



UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - STOUT - MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 54751 

If this person has moved, 
please return to the post 
office with correct address. 



Return Postage Guaranteed 
Address Correction Requested 




Plan now to attend . . . 

1975 HOMECOMING 

Saturday, October 1 1 

Reunions of Classes of 

1950, 1960, 1965 and 1970